News

May 09, 2019

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Less Spray Please! Bees at Work

There is nothing more tragic than going to your hive in the excitement of greeting your girls and being met with a mass of dead bees at the entrance. Flow Team member talks about his recent experience with colony loss and ways we can all act to Save the Bees.

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May 08, 2019

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Bees need drinking water too!

In the height of summer, when temperatures are soaring, it's important to remember that bees (and all wildlife) need access to safe drinking water.

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April 11, 2019

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Springtime is splitting time if you want another colony

Spring is the perfect time to get started with a new colony. “Splitting” is a cost-effective way of establishing a new hive and one of the best gifts an experienced beekeeper can give someone new to the hobby. Hilary Kearney explains how to do it and how to avoid some of the pitfalls associated with this common beekeeping practice.

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April 11, 2019

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How to get bees for your Flow Hive

Although many people have tried, you’ll find that if you place an empty hive in your yard it’s unlikely that a colony will just move in. Beehives are designed to be a perfect home for bees – here are some of the ways you can get a colony to call your Flow Hive home.

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February 10, 2019

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University of Queensland report: Flow Hive honey tastes “fresher” and more “floral”

Flow’s “honey on tap” harvesting technology allows for the honey flavours from individual nectar sources to shine through– much to the delight of honey connoisseurs. Consumers and apiarists are reporting that Flow honey tastes better. Now a University of Queensland (Australia) study has confirmed that you really can Taste the Difference!

According to the Flow-commissioned study “Sensory descriptive profiling of Flow honey compared to honey extracted using conventional methods”, by University of Queensland’s Drs Sandra Olarte and Heather Smyth, the Flow Frame extraction method yields honey with fresher, cleaner flavours then conventionally extracted honey.

UQ scientists took two honeys harvested three different ways and performed taste tests.

University of Queensland Taste testing booths use red lighting to eliminate colour differences between samples enabling panelists to focus on the full flavour experience.

The yellow pea honey and macadamia honey were harvested using conventional methods in an electric centrifugal extractor or commercial extraction facility, or using Flow’s gentle “honey on tap” harvesting technology.

Flow honeys scored lower for less desirable characteristics such as pungency and lingering aftertaste while scoring higher when it came to yummy floral, herbaceous and citrus (bee-licious!).

 

The sensory analysis found that:

  • Flow Frame honeys had fresher, cleaner characters than commercial samples. Flow Frame honeys of both varieties had higher scores for floral aroma. More herbaceous aroma was present in the Flow Hive yellow pea honey samples and more citrus aroma was present in the macadamia honey.
  • The Flow Frame honey samples had the lowest scores for pungency and lingering aftertaste.
  • The commercial honey samples had more caramelised and oxidised like notes making it ‘less fresh’ overall in honeys from both floral sources.
  • The lack of freshness in commercial samples was represented by higher scores for the attribute dried fruit mix aroma and flavour in yellow pea honey, and in the macadamia honey samples by the higher scores for raisin/dark toffee aroma and flavour.

Meanwhile, Flow Hive customers who have entered their honeys into their local agricultural shows are reporting that they are winning medals and ribbons across the world.



How sweet is that?

 

October 25, 2018

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Honey is the perfect treat this Halloween

Happy, spooky Halloween! We share a recipe for healthy, honey-sweetened treats for your little (and big) ghouls and ghosts. Honey is better than sugar after all – especially Flow harvested honey ;-)

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October 15, 2018

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Wintering in different climatic zones

Wondering how to keep your bees cosy over winter? In this blog, we discuss general overwintering, and over-weathering, techniques and preparations to ensure your colony survives through your winter – no matter the weather!

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